top of page

Unvaccinated Former Service Members Unmoved by Army's Offer to Correct Records and Rejoin

Former service members who were ousted from the military due to their refusal to adhere to the now-repealed COVID-19 vaccine mandate are showing a tepid response to the recent Army guidance that presents an opportunity for reinstatement and a correction to their service records.





The announcement, issued on November 7, aimed to extend an olive branch to those who were penalized or discharged for their stance against the mandated vaccine. However, rather than being met with enthusiasm, the letter has been met with skepticism and disinterest by some unvaccinated former soldiers.


In an exclusive conversation with The Epoch Times, Bradley Miller, a former U.S. Army lieutenant colonel who previously served as a battalion commander in the 101st Airborne Division, expressed his discontent with the Army's recent communication. Miller, relieved of his command in October 2021 due to his refusal to take the vaccine, denounced the letter as a "misguided and insincere tactic." He highlighted the evident motive behind this move, suggesting it was primarily to boost the Army's dwindling retention and recruitment rates.


The timing of this announcement is notable as the U.S. Army fell short of its recruitment target by 10,000 soldiers for the second consecutive year. Miller emphasized that former service members like himself seek more than a superficial gesture such as a standard form letter. He emphasized the urgent need for solutions to rectify "the severe problems" caused by the vaccine's repercussions on the force.


The repercussions of the now-repealed vaccine mandate were stark, leading to the expulsion of 1,903 individuals from the military due to their refusal to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.


This development reflects the ongoing tension between former service members and the military establishment following the vaccine mandate's implementation and subsequent revocation. As individuals grapple with the aftermath of their dismissals and the implications on their service records, the Army's attempt to reconcile appears to have fallen short in addressing their concerns and grievances.


The discontent among these former service members underscores the deep-seated issues arising from the vaccination policy within the military and raises questions about the efficacy of the Army's approach in repairing the ruptured relationship with those who stood firm against the vaccine mandate.

Comments


Top Stories

bottom of page